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Teachers hit the picket line for second day in Scranton

Members of the school board say the contract the teacher's union is asking for is more than $13 million more than they can afford.

SCRANTON, Pa. — It was day two of Scranton teachers marching the picket line.  

The Scranton Federation of Teachers says teachers have been without a contract for the last four years, and the school district's offer is unreasonable.  

Members of the school board say the contract the teacher's union is asking for is more than $13 million more than they can afford.

"We're trying to settle a contract. The recovery plan basically outlines that of how we have to settle contracts moving forward while we are under this recovery plan, which is to find the savings within," said Superintendent Missy McTiernan, Scranton School District.

The school board says it is willing to meet anytime to negotiate, but there's not much wiggle room to offer more.

"I think we need to do everything within our power, working with everyone, all of our unions, and everyone within this district and the community to make sure that we do not put ourselves or do anything to put ourselves in receivership," McTiernan said.

Until both sides can come to an agreement, the halls at all of the schools in the Scranton school district will remain empty, and that has parents upset about their kids being at home.

"I think it's a waste of the student's time. They've been out for a year and a half already," said Hope Meals of Scranton.

"I'm frustrated because my kid's a senior, and you just got back into the rhythm of going back to school, but I don't blame the teachers at all. I understand where they're coming from. But I would just like the kids to be back in school," added Kim Thompson of Scranton.

Noah Ardestani is a junior at Scranton High and says after learning virtually last year and now not being in class because of the strike is not the way to get a good education.

"It's their job. It's what they went to school for. It's what they paid for. That's what they live off of their salary. So yes, I do believe they should be able to do that, but I don't think we should punish students by taking them out of school," said Ardestani.

The superintendent says the district has reached out to the state in the hopes of getting some funding to help the union members plan on taking their picket line to Harrisburg in the hopes that the state will hear them as well.

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