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Looking for the Leak: Lansford Pool Losing Water

LANSFORD — A pool in Carbon County has been losing 30 gallons of water per minute and now the Lansford Borough Council is trying to find out just where th...

LANSFORD -- A pool in Carbon County has been losing 30 gallons of water per minute and now the Lansford Borough Council is trying to find out just where the leak is located and how to fix it.

The pool in Lansford was locked up for the day thanks to the threat of bad weather, but borough officials tell us dark clouds are the least of their worries.

This pool has a leak lurking somewhere beneath the surface.

"The pool is going to be closed on Sunday, schools are starting on Monday so we can't really do anything until then," said Lansford Council President Martin Ditsky. "Hopefully we will have an answer to this question."

The maintenance crews and water authority spotted the issue and say the pool is losing about 30 gallons of water per minute. That's more than 43,000 gallons per day, and about 1.3 million gallons per month.

"I hope it gets resolved soon," said Caitlin Heilman of Coaldale. "I understand summer is coming to an end but still, if they get it fixed by the end of this summer, it will be ready for next summer."

Borough council member Rose Mary Cannon says this isn't the first leak this 30-year-old pool has had.

"In 1995, there was one in the 11-foot skimmer area that was losing some water," Cannon recalled.

Losing about 30 gallons of water per minute isn't the only problem folks are worried about. Nobody knows just where this water is going and what other problems it could be causing.

"I'm afraid of the ground opening up underneath us because when you've got that amount of water going under there, it's going to open up underneath," said Tommy Vadyak of Lansford.

Council has set aside $5,000 for a company from New Jersey to check the pool out later this month, and hopefully find that leak. But without knowing what's wrong, officials say it's hard to determine just what will happen next.

"Depending on the work that needs to be done, that is going to be a difficult issue."