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UPDATE: Fetterman’s Recreational Marijuana Listening Tour Making More Local Stops

Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman continues his listening tour to hear from people in every county about the proposal to legalize recreational marijuana in Pen...
fetterman

Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman continues his listening tour to hear from people in every county about the proposal to legalize recreational marijuana in Pennsylvania.

Fetterman will be making stops May 4 – May 13 in several area communities.

BRADFORD COUNTY:

11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, May 4
Towanda Area Jr/Sr High School
1 High School Drive, Towanda, PA 18848

SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY:

2:30 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 4
Blue Ridge High School Auditorium
5058 School Road, New Milford, PA 18834

WYOMING COUNTY:

5:30 to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 4
Tunkhannock Area High School Auditorium
135 Tiger Drive, Tunkhannock, PA 18657

LUZERNE COUNTY:

1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 5
Wilkes University, ballroom, second floor of the Henry Student Center
84 West South Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

SULLIVAN COUNTY:

5 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday, May 5
Sullivan County High School Auditorium
749 South Street, Laporte, PA 18626

MONTOUR COUNTY:

6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 7
Montour Preserve Environmental Education Center Auditorium
374 Preserve Road, Danville, PA 17821

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY:

6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 8
Second Street Community Center
175 Orange Street, Northumberland, PA 17857

CARBON COUNTY:

6 to 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 13
Jim Thorpe Area High School Auditorium
1 Olympian Way, Jim Thorpe, PA 18229

The public is encouraged to attend and share opinions both for and against. Those who cannot attend are still able to submit comments online.

Lawmakers proposed a bill to legalize recreational marijuana in the Keystone State last month. If approved, it would make cannabis legal for adults 21 and older. People could also grow up to six plants of their own.

Officials who support recreational marijuana say taxing it would generate about $600 million a year for programs such as health care and education.

Opponents worry about users driving under the influence or becoming addicted to other drugs.